Williams, E. (2013) ‘Rebranding Feminism’ Creative Review [1 October] available from <http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2013/september/elle-feminism> [10 February 2014]
“Elle magazine has approached three advertising agencies – Brave, Mother and Wieden + Kennedy London – and asked them to rebrand feminism.”
…..
“In assessing the work, I guess the first question that should be asked is whether feminism actually needs rebranding. So many things these days are needlessly rebranded, just for the sake of getting some press attention, yet in the case of feminism the answer is, sadly, a resounding yes. Despite its core principles being about simple equality between men and women - equal political, economic and social rights - over the nearly 80 years since the word was coined, its meaning has warped and shifted so much that it means many different things to different people. If we’re in a position in 2013 where our prime minister still can’t call himself a feminist, the word definitely needs a facelift.”
…..
“It is interesting then that Elle has chosen to do this project now. There has been a resurgence of feminist groups over the last few years, alongside websites such asEveryday Sexism, which highlights the casual sexist remarks and actions that many women experience. The fact that Elle is covering it though suggests a certain tipping point – hardly known as a bastion for political action, the decision to run such a large feature on the subject means that the new feminist movement is finally reaching the mainstream.”
…..
“Wieden + Kennedy and Vagenda have created a press ad that addresses the many stereotypes that women have to field, cliches that are arguably propogated most by women’s magazines, which of course include Elle. The team also created a tear out page (below) to encourage women to get online and write what defines them as a woman on Twitter, using the hashtag #imawomanand. The examples they give include sentences such as ‘I have a PhD’, ‘I’m in prison’ and ‘I’m single by choice’.”
…..
“Returning to the Elle work, it is refreshing to see a project that is able to cut through all the controversy that surrounds the word ‘feminism’ and make some clear points. It is a word with a complicated history, but it should be a word for everyone. Perhaps this project will begin to help that happen.”
 

Williams, E. (2013) ‘Rebranding Feminism’ Creative Review [1 October] available from <http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2013/september/elle-feminism> [10 February 2014]

Elle magazine has approached three advertising agencies – Brave, Mother and Wieden + Kennedy London – and asked them to rebrand feminism.”

…..

In assessing the work, I guess the first question that should be asked is whether feminism actually needs rebranding. So many things these days are needlessly rebranded, just for the sake of getting some press attention, yet in the case of feminism the answer is, sadly, a resounding yes. Despite its core principles being about simple equality between men and women - equal political, economic and social rights - over the nearly 80 years since the word was coined, its meaning has warped and shifted so much that it means many different things to different people. If we’re in a position in 2013 where our prime minister still can’t call himself a feminist, the word definitely needs a facelift.”

…..

It is interesting then that Elle has chosen to do this project now. There has been a resurgence of feminist groups over the last few years, alongside websites such asEveryday Sexism, which highlights the casual sexist remarks and actions that many women experience. The fact that Elle is covering it though suggests a certain tipping point – hardly known as a bastion for political action, the decision to run such a large feature on the subject means that the new feminist movement is finally reaching the mainstream.”

…..

Wieden + Kennedy and Vagenda have created a press ad that addresses the many stereotypes that women have to field, cliches that are arguably propogated most by women’s magazines, which of course include Elle. The team also created a tear out page (below) to encourage women to get online and write what defines them as a woman on Twitter, using the hashtag #imawomanand. The examples they give include sentences such as ‘I have a PhD’, ‘I’m in prison’ and ‘I’m single by choice’.”

…..

Returning to the Elle work, it is refreshing to see a project that is able to cut through all the controversy that surrounds the word ‘feminism’ and make some clear points. It is a word with a complicated history, but it should be a word for everyone. Perhaps this project will begin to help that happen.”

 

(Source: creativereview.co.uk)

@4 months ago with 1 note

Symbols of Feminism: Past, Present and Outside the Box 

@4 months ago

Bibliography (SO FAR): Visual Ecologies, Year 2 Sem 2

Boycott, R. (2013) ‘The Feminist Times is just as necessary as Spare Rib’The Guardian [online] 8 October. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/womens-blog/2013/oct/08/the-feminist-times-necessary-spare-rib> [18 February 2014]

Cochrane, K. (2013) ‘All the Rebel Women: The rise of the fourth wave of feminism’ Guardian Shorts:London 


Cochrane, K. (2013) ‘The fourth wave of feminism: meet the rebel women’ The Guardian [online] 10 December. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/10/fourth-wave-feminism-rebel-women> [17 February 2014]

Cochrane, L. (2013) ‘Marks & Spencer’s new ad: what does it mean?’ The Guardian. [online] 19 August. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/fashion/fashion-blog/2013/aug/19/marks-spencer-new-ad-annie-leibowitz> [10 February 2014]

Cocozza, P. (2013) ‘Inspirational women for a girl to look up to - in pictures’ The Guardian [online] 15 November. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/gallery/2013/nov/15/inspirational-women-for-girl-in-pictures#/?picture=422376490&index=0> [18 February]

Davies, C. (2013) ‘Spare Rib contributors sought so editions can be digitised and saved’ The Guardian [online] 13 December.Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/dec/13/spare-rib-magazine-digitised-british-library> [17 February 2014]


Freeman, H. (2013) ‘Ellen Page: “Why are people so reluctant to say they’re feminists?”’ The Guardian [online] 3 July. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/jul/03/ellen-page-interview-the-east> [19 February 2014]

Freeman, H. (2013) ‘Why feminism doesn’t need a makeover’ The Guardian [online] 12 November. Available on [18 February 2014]

The Guardian (2013)’Secret Teacher: why is feminism still a dirty word in the classroom?’ The Guardian. 23 November. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2013/nov/23/feminism-classroom-dirty-word-secret-teacher> [18th February 2014]

Laing, O. (2013) ‘Riot grrrl: when teen sisters were doing it for themselves’ The Guardian [online] 30 Jun. Available on <http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/jun/30/riot-grrrl-collection-zine-olivia-laing> [19 February 2014]

Mangan, L. (2013) ‘why feminism doesn’t need rebranding’ The Guardian[online] 16 November. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/nov/16/feminism-rebranding-lucy-mangan> [17 February 2014]


Miller, J., H. (1942) We Can Do It! [online] available from <http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_538122> [10 March 2014]

O’Hagan, E. M. (2013) ‘Lily Allen does not represent all feminism – and nor should she’ The Guardian [online] 13 November. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/nov/13/lily-allen-video-represent-feminism-feminist-woman> [18 February 2014]

Penny, L. (2013) ‘If you’re a feminist you’ll be called a man-hater. You don’t need rebranding’ The Guardian [online] 7 October. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/oct/07/feminism-rebranding-man-hater> [18 February 2014]

Plank, E. (2013) Disturbing Google Searches For Feminism, Re-Imagined by Inspiring Feminists [online] 13 November available from <http://www.policymic.com/articles/73171/disturbing-google-searches-for-feminism-re-imagined-by-inspiring-feminists> [18 March 2014]

Reidy, T. (2013) ‘Young feminists join together to organise a world without sexism’ The Guardian [online] 17 August. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/17/new-feminism-feminista-summer-school> [18 February]

Richardson Taylor, A. (2013) ‘BBH New York graphic ads show flipside of arguments for Guardian US’ Creative Review. [online] 5 March. Available from <http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2013/march/guardian-us-campaign> [10 February 2014]

Richardson Taylor, A. (2013) ’M&S celebrates Britain’s ‘leading ladies’ in new campaign’ 19 August. Creative Review. [online] Available from <http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2013/august/ms> [10 February 2014]


Rivas, J. (2012) ‘D.C. Launches First Ever Transgender Respect Ad Campaign’. Colourlines.com [online] 14 September. Available from <http://colorlines.com/archives/2012/09/dc_lauches_first_ever_transgender_respect_ads.html> [10 February 2014]

Rose, G. (2001) ’Visual Methodologies’ SAGE Publications:London

Rowe, M. (2013) ‘Spare Rib was born of grassroots feminism. It’s not a brand’ The Guardian [online] 14 June. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jun/14/spare-rib-grassroots-feminism-not-brand> [19 February 2014]

Sherriff, L., Driscill, B. (2013) Huffington Post’s collation of ‘Spare Rib’s most iconic covers. [online] available from <http://huff.to/17OuUi3> [10 March 2014]

Thorpe, V. (2013) ‘What now for Britain’s new-wave feminists – after page 3 and £10 notes?’ The Guardian [online] 27 July. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jul/27/new-generation-of-feminists-set-agenda> [19 February 2014]

Williams, E. (2013) ‘Rebranding Feminism’ Creative Review. [online] 1 October. Available from <http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2013/september/elle-feminism> [10 February 2014]

Yeomans, M. (2012) ‘Does Benetton’s new social media campaign for social justice stack up?’. The Guardian [online] 24 September. Available from <http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/blog/benetton-unemployee-social-media-campaign-justice> [10 February 2014]

@4 months ago

Models and Menstruation: Spare Rib Magazine, Feminism, Femininity and Pleasure by Selina Todd 

"It is not simply a textual analysis, but seeks to explore the influence of, and Spare Rib’s impact on, the social and political context from which it emerged. Before turning to the feminist debates within the magazine, then, it is important to note to whom it was addressed and from where it emerged: the focus of the first section. I will then discuss the difficulties inherent in Spare Rib’s, and second wave feminism’s, attempts to theorise women’s oppression, particularly when dealing with women’s pleasure and the construction of femininity. Thirdly, I will explore why despite the fact that personal life is the conventional realm of women’s magazines, it was difficult for Spare Rib to embrace the feminist philosophy that ‘the personal is political’. Section four will examine the magazine’s attempts to explore the relationship between femininity and feminism, and the questions this raises about the social construction of pleasure and womanhood. In conclusion, the legacy of the early Spare Rib for feminists crafting a critique of femininity, while sympathetically exploring and possibly celebrating women’s pleasure, will be discussed."

@4 months ago
#spare rib 
Miller, J., H. (1942) We Can Do It! [online] available from &lt;http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_538122&gt; [10 March 2014]
&#8216;
Artist J. Howard Miller produced this work-incentive poster for the Westinghouse Electric &amp; Manufacturing Company. Though displayed only briefly in Westinghouse factories, the poster in later year has become one of the most famous icons of World War II.As women were encouraged to take wartime jobs in defense industries, they became a celebrated symbol of female patriotism. But when the war ended, many industries forced women to relinquish their skilled jobs to returning veterans.&#8217;Photolithograph

Miller, J., H. (1942) We Can Do It! [online] available from <http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_538122> [10 March 2014]

Artist J. Howard Miller produced this work-incentive poster for the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company. Though displayed only briefly in Westinghouse factories, the poster in later year has become one of the most famous icons of World War II.As women were encouraged to take wartime jobs in defense industries, they became a celebrated symbol of female patriotism. But when the war ended, many industries forced women to relinquish their skilled jobs to returning veterans.’

Photolithograph

(Source: americanhistory.si.edu)

@4 months ago
#we can do it #propaganda 

Ogilvy, M., Dubai, M. (2013) UN Women Campaign [online] available from <http://www.unwomen.org/ca/news/stories/2013/10/women-should-ads> [24 March 2014]

UN Women (2013) ‘UN Women ad series reveals widespread sexism’ UN Women [21 October] Available online <http://www.unwomen.org/ca/news/stories/2013/10/women-should-ads> [24 March 2014]

"A series of ads, developed as a creative idea for UN Women by Memac Ogilvy & Mather Dubai, uses genuine Google searches to reveal the widespread prevalence of sexism and discrimination against women. Based on searches dated 9 March, 2013 the ads expose negative sentiments ranging from stereotyping as well as outright denial of women’s rights.

“When we came across these searches, we were shocked by how negative they were and decided we had to do something with them,” says Christopher Hunt, Art Director of the creative team. The idea developed places the text of the Google searches over the mouths of women portraits, as if to silence their voices. 

“The ads are shocking because they show just how far we still have to go to achieve gender equality. They are a wake up call, and we hope that the message will travel far,” adds Kareem Shuhaibar, copy writer.

For UN Women, the searches confirm the urgent need to continue making the case for women’s rights, empowerment and equality, a cause the organization is pursuing around the world. UN Women is heartened by the initial strong reaction to the ads and hopes they will spark constructive dialogue globally.”

(Source: unwomen.org)

@4 months ago with 104 notes
#feminism #un women #advertising campaign #google search #autocomplete 
Goldwert,L. (2010) 'Rosie the Riveter girl on 'We Can Do It!' WWII poster dead; Geraldine Doyle dead at age 86' New York Daily News [online] 30 December. Available from &lt;http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/rosie-riveter-girl-wwii-poster-dead-geraldine-doyle-dead-age-86-article-1.475293&gt; [21 March 2014]&#8221;The poster of a young woman in a factory uniform and red polka dot head kerchief, her arm flexed to show off her muscle with  a speech balloon stating boldly, &#8220;We can do it!&#8221; was designed to encourage young woman to volunteer for the war effort while men were serving overseas.
Eventually 6 million women would heed the call and enter the workforce during the war years. 
The image of Rosie the Riveter, itself inspired by a Norman Rockwell painting of the same name, became an instant classic and was later adopted by the women’s rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s.&#8221;
&#8220;Rosie the Riveter is the image of an independent woman who is in control of her own destiny,&#8221; said Gladys Beckwith, former director of the Michigan Women&#8217;s Historical Center and Hall of Fame, which honored Doyle in 2002 told the Lansing State Journal.&#8221;
&#8220;She didn&#8217;t know that it was her image that become the classic symbol of empowerment and equality of the sexes.&#8221;

Goldwert,L. (2010) 'Rosie the Riveter girl on 'We Can Do It!' WWII poster dead; Geraldine Doyle dead at age 86' New York Daily News [online] 30 December. Available from <http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/rosie-riveter-girl-wwii-poster-dead-geraldine-doyle-dead-age-86-article-1.475293> [21 March 2014]

The poster of a young woman in a factory uniform and red polka dot head kerchief, her arm flexed to show off her muscle with  a speech balloon stating boldly, “We can do it!” was designed to encourage young woman to volunteer for the war effort while men were serving overseas.

Eventually 6 million women would heed the call and enter the workforce during the war years. 

The image of Rosie the Riveter, itself inspired by a Norman Rockwell painting of the same name, became an instant classic and was later adopted by the women’s rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s.”

Rosie the Riveter is the image of an independent woman who is in control of her own destiny,” said Gladys Beckwith, former director of the Michigan Women’s Historical Center and Hall of Fame, which honored Doyle in 2002 told the Lansing State Journal.”

She didn’t know that it was her image that become the classic symbol of empowerment and equality of the sexes.”

(Source: New York Daily News)

@4 months ago
#we can do it! #feminism #female empowerment #geraldine doyle #new york daily news 

(almost) final images chosen for essay

@4 months ago

Plank, E. (2013) Disturbing Google Searches For Feminism, Re-Imagined by Inspiring Feminists. PolicyMic[online] 13 November available from <http://www.policymic.com/articles/73171/disturbing-google-searches-for-feminism-re-imagined-by-inspiring-feminists> [18 March 2014]

One single Google search for feminism reveals just how much work is left to be done.

There’s a general assumption that feminists have won the war on inequality, but as the viral UN Women Google auto-complete campaign showed in October, women still face a shocking amount of discrimination and abuse across the world. That unfortunate reality is only more pronounced for the very people fighting to reverse this trend: feminists.

Start typing “feminism” and “feminists” into Google search, and see what disturbing results come up.

Whether it was the death threats thrown at feminist activist Caroline Criado-Perez for successfully protesting for Jane Austen to be on the £10 bill, or the rape threats that political analyst Zerlina Maxwell received after she opened up about her experience with sexual assault, feminists still face an unbelievable amount of vitriol, and Google searches only make that even clearer.

Thankfully, there are courageous people working to change that. Despite the stigma they face, vocal men and women are fighting every day to refashion a world in which feminists are celebrated for their courage, rather than threatened for their beliefs.

Below, these heroes show us what that world would look like. I’ve juxtaposed the shocking auto-complete results for feminism on the faces of prominent feminists working hard to change the status quo. In orange, I’ve highlighted what Google would say if feminists were understood for who they are and what they really fight for.

Everyone deserves to live in a world where they are treated with respect, and believing in equality should never get in the way.

(Source: policymic.com)

@4 months ago with 2 notes
#feminism #rebranding feminism #branding #google search 

Sherriff, L., Driscill, B. (2013) Huffington Post’s collation of ‘Spare Rib’s most iconic covers. [online] available from <http://huff.to/17OuUi3> [10 March 2014]

(See also Stylist’s favourite Spare Rib covers)

(Source: huff.to)

@4 months ago
#feminism #Feminist Magazine #spare rib #the huffington post #magazine covers #1